FOOTPRINTS AND IN A PICKLE ABOUT PRESERVES

Sidey’s weekend theme is FOOTPRINTS,

Can a rabbit break a heart?

I really didn’t want to write this post, I kept hoping she’d just reappear; that she had wandered into a distant corner of the garden and would come – as she did every morning – speeding around the corner to say hello when I filled her food and water bowls.

It’s been four days now, I must accept that she somehow managed to get out through a fence and can’t find her way back. I’ve put up posters around the neighborhood …

Lulubelle is forlorn and obsessively rootling around trying to sniff her out.

Ah,Charlotte, my sweet bunny; your have left your little footprints on my heart.

On then to less sadness and cooking away my grief. One of Tandy’s recent ingredient challenges is to cook using preserves. This sent off on a fact finding mission to ascertain how preserves are defined, as opposed to pickled. It seems to be a fine line, Wikipedia tells us this:

“Fruit preserves are preparations of fruits and sugar, often canned or sealed for long-term storage. The preparation of fruit preserves today often involves adding commercial or natural pectin as a gelling agent, although sugar or honey may be used, as well. Prior to World War II, fruit preserve recipes did not include pectin, and many artisan jams today are made without pectin. The ingredients used and how they are prepared determine the type of preserves; jams, jellies and marmalades are all examples of different styles of fruit preserves that vary based upon the ingredients used.

Many varieties of fruit preserves are made globally, including sweet fruit preserves, such as strawberry, as well as savoury preserves of culinary vegetables, such as tomatoes or squash. In North America, the plural form “preserves” is used to describe all types of jams and jellies. In British and Commonwealth English most fruit preserves are simply called jam, with the singular preserve being applied to high fruit content jam, often for marketing purposes. Additionally, the name of the type of fruit preserves will also vary depending on the regional variant of English being used.”

And goes on to further blur the lines by dividing the types into a list:

So, very confused, I stood staring at my fridge and grocery shelves. I had:

Chutney (peach), confit of duck (Feinschmecker hamper), Lemon curd (don’t ask!), assorted Verlaque jars, marmalade … the list of items went on and on.

In the end I decided to first boil my Feinschmecker turkey & gammon roll  in water with bayleaves, cloves and peppercorns; then bake it with a Verlaque Pinotage and pear basting and serve it with preserved sauerkraut and boiled potatoes. All things considered, it was a good choice. I bet the leftovers are going to make a fine sandwich this evening … I’m thinking rye bread and hot pickles …

As it turns out, I misread Tandy’s post, the challenge was to make preserves, not cook with them …

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56 thoughts on “FOOTPRINTS AND IN A PICKLE ABOUT PRESERVES

  1. My mother would spend this time of the year making jams and jellies as well as preserving vegetables and making tomato sauce from our garden every day and every night. I was in high school before I knew that vegetables came froma store and not from one’s garden or from the root cellar!

  2. naughty bunny, hopping off. Animals have no respect for hearts.. And what a perfect choice of cold meats and preserves, so what is the story behind the lemon curd then? huh? .. hiding something are we? c

  3. Oh, Charlotte Bunny, hearts on this side of the world are breaking too….let us hope she has found a right royal bunny mansion, or is planning a surprise return. My heart aches for Lulubelle…

  4. I am soooo sorry to hear about Charlotte!! The meal looks and sounds delicious!! You can still make a preserve another time!! 🙂

    Enjoy the week,Cindy!

  5. oh boo…runny babbit (as Shel Silverstein would say)…perhaps she is off in the patch with the rest of Beatrix’s crew… Rye bread and pickles..with a touch of spicy mustard and tomatoes, a vegan delish ~

  6. Oh Cindy I am so sorry. I can just imagine how broken hearted you must be. Animals have such a way of sticking right into the middle of our hearts. I pray that she comes back safe and soon.

  7. I just remembered the silly rabbit that I had in high school. She was never really friendly and loving but I spent many a day chasing her through the streets as she ran away. I loved her even when she didn’t love me. When I was 18 we had to move out of state so I had to give her away and it was so horrible. I didn’t really think those people were going to take care of her the way I did. Oh gee now I am crying. I haven’t thought about her in so long. I do hope your bunny comes home.

  8. Sorry about your missing bunny, hope she finds her way home, soon.

    I love making preserves and pickles. Spent Saturday with a friend doing up pickled beets. My brothers will be thrilled!

  9. Rye bread! You had to mention rye bread: one of the things I most miss having on my enforced gluten-free diet. Phew!

    Oh well. The perserve thing is tricky, isn’t it? I think here we call anything went from garden to jar “preserve.” But, I could be wrong. I just freeze everthing … Not very romantic though: “Have some of my fresh frozen blueberry jam!” vs. “… and here’s my blueberry jam preserve.”

  10. Aaah, how sad for the bunny :*( (I missed the part of how you came about having her or for how long…) One thing is for sure: animals become like children in the home. They add that something unique and adorable in their own simple, special way.

    I do like chutney too.

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