THE WIND BENEATH MY WINGS

 

 

On August 4 in 1983 Dave Winfield, a N.Y. Yankee outfielder accidentally killed a seagull with an errant throw in a game against the Toronto Blue Jays. He was arrested, charged with cruelty to animals and had to post a $500 bond. The charges were dropped the following day. (foodreference.com)

Shame, poor seagull. I wonder if they are edible? In fact, I often wonder how the first poultry eaters knew which birds would go nicely in the oven with a couple of potatoes for roasting. I can’t find any other history, but here I found that “The practice of raising chickens for food is ancient, with the first domestication of poultry thought to have occurred in southernAsiaover 4,000 years ago. The popularity of eating chickens has fluctuated throughout history; at times, chicken has been thought of as a luxury item, while at other times, it has fallen into disregard and obscurity.

During the early history of theUnited States, the settlers brought chickens with them fromEurope. While at first, chickens were raised by individual families for their own consumption, as the developing towns expanded and flock sizes increased, surplus chickens were sold or bartered for groceries. While the development of modern refrigeration methods and more rapid transportation in the late 19th century increased poultry production, it was not until after World War II that developments in raising poultry increased, making chickens more available, and more popular, throughout the country. ”

 

Moving right along. My daughter had a sore throat last week and – fearful that it would develop into something like the flu I suffered recently – I made her stay in bed. Towards midday, she said she wanted Spur chicken wings. I refused, she nagged. I will not go to a Spur, even under threat of death, so I compromised and bought a bottle of their sauce at the supermarket.

 

She was none the wiser. Motherhood requires a good deal of subterfuge at times …

This picture is for Paula, because she likes butterflies, I thought of her last night when I drank it and because it goes particularly well with chicken wings.

Advertisements

61 thoughts on “THE WIND BENEATH MY WINGS

  1. Lol @ the Spur post. Last year I had food poisoning from Spur wings @ Maponya mall and my Niece loves it because of the play area. So far I haven’t introduced it to K. Nandos wings are my fave 🙂

  2. I wonder if seagulls would be more turkeyish or chickenish…
    Pete gets crispy grilled chicken wings with chippies and sweet chilli sauce every now and again too. Husband / child – same thing right?
    🙂 Mandy

  3. Very interesting about chickens. I never knew that much about them except that they are always around (I live near a rural section of the city). Chicken soup is the preferred remedy for anything that ails you, according to my grandmother.

  4. Ooooooh! Now I know what wine you can serve when I come (one of them anyway!). Thanks for the mention!

    BTW, the development of chicken producing in the US has gone way beyond anything beyond anyones imagination, and is one of the most cruel things that is done in the name of meat production in the world. Same for turkeys. While I am not a vegetarian, I refuse to buy any poultry or eggs that has not been raised cage-free and free range. You would not believe some of the conditions those poor things have to live in. Makes my stomach turn.

    I remember one of my favorite stories/jokes: Two cave men were sitting on their rocks when they noticed a cow out in the field, with a calf busily nursing on her. After a long time of reflection, one of the cavemen puffed his chest up, beat on it and told his friend, “You see that huge creature standing out there in the field? You see those things dangling down from between its hind legs? Did you watch that little one bite and suck on one of the pointy things?” His buddy said, “Yes, I see it – scary isn’t it?” The first then said, “Well I’m going out to that animal, trap it, and suck on one of those things, and whatever comes out, I’m going to drink it.” THus we have the first human to drink cow’s milk.

  5. I hope your daughter feel better soon!Your Chicken meal looks yummy!And I am sure the wine is very delicious.
    If you like see some pics of Hamburg…in my blog :O))you could find some.Have a nice day!

  6. That’s a gorgeous bottle of wine . . . and loved your food reference tidbit today:

    I would have had no problem representing Dave Winfield against the charge of cruelty to animals ~ clearly the seagull “assumed the risk.” If not, it was contributorily negligent. 😉

  7. How clever of you! 🙂 I have some fond youth memories of Spur. We had many a dinner out when we couldn’t afford much. We used to keep a close eye on their specials. When I think Spur I think onion rings with the white sauce that they always have on the table – and those little doughy fritter “thingies” that they have in the salad bar sometimes 🙂 OH! And their Malva pudding with ice cream and/or custard!! YUM YUM!

  8. Birds get taken out with painful regularity on golf courses, but I’ve never heard of it happening in a baseball game! (I hit a kangaroo once in the thigh on the golf course, but, thankfully, it was fine – and we were far apart, so I received merely a dirty and not a boxing)

  9. That wine bottle is beautiful, and your chicken and chips all look delicious! In fact, I’d say your chips are hands down a winner over Aaron’s ones on Masterchef last night 😀

  10. I would imagine seagulls to be fishy but I wouldn’t eat them because they eat all the rubbish they find lying around. I also wouldn’t eat hadidahs. Would you?

  11. Interesting question about seagulls as food. Curious. Almost anything is food someplace in the world. Did a search. So far all I can see is that sometimes when people are stranded on rafts or islands they will then eat gull.

    Hmmm, but there are lots of foods that I don’t eat anymore and less and less meat and poultry … Veggies are good! 🙂 Those wings look good too, must admit. Like bbq wings here.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s