A TART FOR DALI, POPEYE AND OLIVE

Salvador Dali hated spinach with a passion bordering on fetishism. He said of it:

“I detest spinach because of its utterly amorphous character….the only good, noble and edible thing to be found in that sordid nourishment is the sand.”

I think that’s a really rude thing to say about this unassuming and faithful green. I love it in all forms; tossed in a crude salad, wilted into mashed potato, in soups … but – most of all – I love it in pie. Last Friday’s post received several FB messages from friends asking for the recipe, which astonished me as it must be the easiest dish to make, ever.

Spinach, I can confirm, mingles like a jingle with green olives under a blanket of cheddar in a pie. I had to wonder if Elzie Crisler Segar had this chemistry in mind, way back in 1929, when she created that electric love affair between Popeye and Olive.
No; I am, and always will be, a champion of Spinach; much like Grimrod (who would name a baby that?) de la Reyniere:
“Spinach is susceptible of receiving all imprints: It is the virgin wax of the kitchen.”
 

1 roll brown puff pastry
1 packet baby spinach cooked and all excess water squeezed out

1 tin white asparagus
1 packet pitted green olives
a cup of grated extra mature cheddar
salt and ground black pepper, ground nutmeg

4 eggs, whisked with a ½ cup of cream

Line your dish with puff pastry
Place the spinach in a layer, then the asparagus, then the olives
Cover with cheese
Mix the seasoning into the egg/cream mixture and pour into dish, making sure to cover all the cheese
Bake at 180C until done. Mine took about 40 minutes.

Alternative: You could add a layer of shredded ham between the spinach and asparagus.
Serve at room temperature with a seasonal salad.

Spinach (Wikipedia):

The popularity of Popeye helped boost sales of the leafy vegetable. Spinach consumption increased 33 percent in the United States between 1931 and 1936 as Popeye gained popularity, saving the spinach industry in the 1930s. Using Popeye as a role model for healthier eating may work, a 2010 study revealed that children increased their vegetable consumption after watching Popeye cartoons.

 

 

 

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33 thoughts on “A TART FOR DALI, POPEYE AND OLIVE

  1. Don’t tell my friends who I’ve convinced I don’t cook – BUT I am going to make this dish. It looks yummy.

    Dali is one of my favs, but I’ll have to work hard to overlook his attitude about a little bit of greenery that is so full of nourishment.

  2. I love my spinach in all shapes and forms, especially baby spinach leaves in a salad. Hubby hates it with a passion, so I’m forever disguising it in pasta dishes so he’ll scoff it down with nary a frown! This I can see him loving, so a big thank you from me 🙂

  3. Sounds delish – will definitely try it, especially if I don’t have to make my own puff pastry! They are trying to make brussels sprouts popular over here … not sure how effective that will be!
    Sunshine xx

  4. I am obviously a nonconformist. I loved Popeye cartoons as a kid. I hated spinach and kept hating it. Now I find the cartoons mildly amusing but simply love spinach, notwithstanding some idiots coming out with findings that it has no nutritional value or benefit. THAT I don’t believe.

  5. What do you mean by “brown” puff pastry? Do you mean “whole wheat” or that it should be browned first? Thanks for the answer – just curious, as i don’t believe I’ve ever seen “brown” puff pastry!

    BTW, I think refrigerated canned “crescent rolls” would work well as the crust for this too – separate them into triangles, unroll, and place in pie tin with the endges pinched and sealed together. just an idea, and probably not as good as the regular puff pastry, but maybe easier to find over here in the USA.

  6. Excellent looking recipes. I’m not a great fan of spinach (it sticks to the teeth)… but like it cooked into things, especially with egg and Cyclo loves it.

    I really like it with goats cheese on top of a huge open mushroom, with lots of garlic and nutmeg and toasted pine nuts.

  7. I love spinach ~ in soups, in rice dishes, with pasta, and (my fave) in Spanokopita with salty feta cheese, buttery phyllo dough, and lovely olives on the side.

    Thanks, Cin!

  8. Pingback: Cindy’s Spinach and Asparagus Tart « The Complete Cook Book Blog

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